CASE STUDY - 2021

IAMS, NOSEiD: A better way to find lost dogs

01 - Intro

About NOSEiD

America has a lost pet problem. Even though every dog is irreplaceably unique, most ways of keeping them safe are one-size-fits-all.

IAMS created NOSEiD to make it easier for you to reconnect with your lost dog. The app helps you capture your dog’s unique nose print and guides you through what to do in case your buddy ever gets lost. It can even help people who have found your dog get in touch with you faster.

My team

Partnering teams

Project overview

02 - NOSEiD App

The problem

The client has pointed out that there is a low install to registration ratio. One of their requirements was that the onboarding process needs to be optimised to engage the users more before registering, and the other hypothesis was that there is a problem with the registration process itself.

Understanding phase

My first steps was to get the app, make sure I click everything to understand it, map it as a user flow on a Miro board and present my first thoughts about registration and onboarding to the team.

After this, I asked Saima, our analyst, to give me the exact screen names, event names and on a collaborative session, we saw a few numbers from analytics to get an idea on how to move next.

Plan and hypothesise

Plan and approach:

  1. Review data from analytics to identify areas with low conversion rates and create hypothesis based on data aroundregistration & onboarding.
  2. Create updated versions that need testing to validate our hypothesis and test these updates with clickable prototypes.
  3. Analyse results & share recommendations for any optimisations that will improve conversion through the onboarding &registration flows.

What we see:

5th of July to 1st of August

What we see:

5th of July to 1st of August

Hypothesis:

  1. Users would prefer to register first and be offered an ”onboarding process” afterwards.
  2. Users would be more likely to complete registration after having abetter/non- intrusive intro of app.
  3. Users would prefer a tailored onboarding process, based on their specific need state.
  4. Users find some steps within the flow to be repetitive, which puts them off.
  5. Users would be more likely to complete registration if we ask about their dog first.
  6. Alternative CTAs would increase the likelihood of registration.
    Ex. let them know that what to expect on the next screen.

Preparing for testing

We then went into Miro again and after a few collaborative sessions with the team, brainstorming on what we are going to be testing and how we will test our hypothesis.

The journeys to be tested:

  1. Straight into the app (logged outmode). Ask for registration when the user attempts to add a dog or create a report.
  2. Simplified registration process with prompts to complete onboarding once logged in.
  3. Ask about their need state and then guide them to a tailored onboarding & registration.
  4. Alternative CTAs for “register”and “create account” (within the current flow).

Testinng

The prototype:

Results

Extracting all the results from the testing sessions and sorting them out to find all the useful comments that will help us move forward.

After this, the direction was quite clear, and we moved on to produce some ideas for solutions.

Solution ideas

Loads of brainstorming sessions, collaborative remote sessions and Miro board frames / canvases later.

Final solutions

Although the comments were broadly positive across all 4 journeys, there was a consistent theme that suggested that the optimal journey would involve registration before everything else. People expect to create an account first.

The onboarding tour should be optional

There were lots of positive comments around the push notifications for an app walkthrough. Respondents appreciated the idea of being given the chance to get to know the app more, and this did not appear disrupt their journey.

The early introduction to the app

We also saw a few comments that made it clear to us, some people want to see what the app is about, before deciding to give their details away. This is why we delivered with a better copy explaining exactly what we do, with a link to an overlay video for a quick introduction to how the product works.

See your password instead of entering it twice

We also saw a few comments that made it clear to us, some people want to see what the app is about, before deciding to give their details away. This is why we delivered with a better copy explaining exactly what we do, with a link to an overlay video for a quick introduction to how the product works.

Sign-posting the fact that you’ll get an email verification

We also saw a few comments that made it clear to us, some people want to see what the app is about, before deciding to give their details away. This is why we delivered with a better copy explaining exactly what we do, with a link to an overlay video for a quick introduction to how the product works.

The onboarding tour should be optional

There were lots of positive comments around the push notifications for an app walkthrough. Respondents appreciated the idea of being given the chance to get to know the app more, and this did not appear disrupt their journey.

The early introduction to the app

We also saw a few comments that made it clear to us, some people want to see what the app is about, before deciding to give their details away. This is why we delivered with a better copy explaining exactly what we do, with a link to an overlay video for a quick introduction to how the product works.

See your password instead of entering it twice

A few users mentioned that they appreciate that they were able to view their password before registering. This is quickly becoming a UX best practice as it tends to speed up onboarding and registration processes.

Sign-posting the fact that you’ll get an email verification

On previous testing workshops we saw a big frustration on the “unexpected” verification link. On the last workshop after adding the explanation, we saw no frustration around that area and received positive comments. This also aligns with UX best practice to warn the user for:

1. What comes next

2. What will happen with their personal details.

Define mandatory and optional fields

There was a clear frustration between testers for not being able to know what fields they need to fill and what fields they can leave blank in order to continue.

Next stesps

  1. Correct/rethink copies
  2. Perform bug tests throughout all types of registration(Email, Google, Facebook, Apple)
  3. Send bug test results to dev team
  4. Apply opt-ins as advised by legal team
  5. Get feedback from client (approved)
  6. Send for production
  7. Wait for 2 weeks after the release
  8. Run analytics
  9. Observe results (1st of August – 3 of September)

Results

  1. ~35% increased download to registration ratio
  2. ~35% increased conversion through onboarding
  3. 50% more users created a profile for their dogs in the app
  4. 20% more nose IDs captured

Key takeaways

  1. Research in a larger scale
  2. Brainstorming with specialists coming from big markets
  3. Better understanding of writing questioners
  4. Better understanding of creating a testing plan
  5. Exercise the fast-paced delivery
  6. Exercise how to present ideas and suggestions to clients